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Diwali (9)

Send a funny Diwali Ecard from Rubber Chicken Cards

Diwali (Indian New Year) - "Muse"
Views: 5205
It is the day we celebrate the New Year and the inner light. Clean up your life and light the light.
Diwali - "God"
Views: 6449
On the Indian "Festival of Lights" God, yes God, gives some advice on how to squeeze the bliss out of life.
Diwali - "Guptah"
Views: 5303
The local sage honors both the inner and outer lights on Dwali.
Diwali - "Packrats"
Views: 7966
Ruth and Ed have an amazing candle collection for the Indian New Year.
Diwali - "Flight Attendant"
Views: 7482
Our flight attendant, Jenny Sue, just bubbles over about the festival of lights, Diwali.
Diwali - "Bongo and Tone"
Views: 4741
The Beat Poets create a poem about the Festival of Lights.
Diwali - "Juicy Juice"
Views: 6580
Kimmi the Juice Girl is excited about cleaning up her life for Diwali, the Indian New Year.
Diwali - "Louise the Angel"
Views: 5430
Louise the Valley Girl Angel honors Diwali with lights and candles, and other angels.
Diwali - "The Flashback Boys"
Views: 7555
The Flashback Boys, with the combined and diminished I.Q. of a gum wrapper, ponder the inner experience on Diwali, the Indian New Year, and the festival of lights.
 Diwali

Deep in the Vali

Diwali ecards: Di What? That's right! Diwali! Di Festival. The origin of "Diwali" is a simmered reduction of "Deepavali", which if translated properly means "row of lamps,"or in modern day "track lighting."

Lots of Light

Diwali festivities include the lighting of clay lamps filled with oil squeegeed off of the backside of retired Bollywood stage hands. These Bollywood backside oil filled lamps are light to shine into the darkness, the old good over evil scenario. These lamps are kept lit all throughout the night whilst folks meticulously clean house in order to make the goddess Lakshmi feel welcome. This is so her OCD doesn't interfere with the positive vibes. Curry filled water balloons are lobed straight up, because it is believed that when they splat on the ground it drives away the evil demon, ogress spirits. Whilst Diwali is in full swing, all the celebrants don their new clothes and share sweets, tweets, and snack packs with their community.

The New Year

The festival begins with Dhanteras, which starts the financial year for most Indian businesses. The second day is called the Naraka Chaturdasi. On the third day Amavasya, they worship Lakshmi, the goddess of fermented goat meat. The fourth day is Kartika Shudda Padyami Ma Ma Se Ma Ma Sa Ma Ma Ma Koo Sayami. The fifth day (MAN! Do these folks like to party) is called Yama Dvitiya, and on this day Sisters invite their Brothers over to discuss what they're going to do when their parents get old.

A Treat

Alright! Let us review, and simplify so your neurological pathways don't fuse. If you're one of the many few who have never heard of this fabulous holiday, you are really in for a special treat. Diwali is a holiday celebrated by several far eastern cultures to commemorate the everlasting triumph of good over evil (Hey, wait, when exactly did that happen?). It's celebrated between the end of October and the beginning of November, and mostly in countries with large Hindu and Indian Populations. But just as Easter and Christmas have morphed from being religious holidays, you can culturally celebrate "the Festival of Lights" cultural Diwali ECards. Of course, they're always good to send to your friends and family that actually practice the holiday as well.

Celebrate

To celebrate your own Diwali, you can set up lights during each night of the festival, have sweets, go vegetarian, and take care of your family, all customary things that happen during this very ethnically obscure but awesome holiday! What else can you do? Cook Indian food, or go out and enjoy some, clean out your house, wrap a turban around your head, and have a party for all your friends. And of course, send out some of our festive Diwali Ecards!

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